Blog: SANS Penetration Testing

Blog: SANS Penetration Testing

Easter Challenge - The Mystery of the Missing Easter Bunny

By Chris Andre Dale

The Easter Bunny has been kidnapped, and YOU have to save him! Quickly collect yourself and help save him. Put on your detective hat and start investigating the clues provided.

We managed to intercept a message from the kidnappers. Unfortunately it seems to be scrambled in some way. We also managed to intercept a ciphered message from one of the criminals and the cipher text below. The cipher text was once considered unbreakable, however newer techniques of cryptoanalysis have proven how to beat it. Listen to the intercepted message from the kidnappers, or attack the cipher message. Your choice.

The intercepted message can be played back here:

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SANS Python Pen Testers | Exploit Heartbleed Vulnerabilities | SEC573

Pen Testers use Python to assess HeartBleed vulnerabilities.

By Mark Baggett

Unless you've been living in a cave without access to the outside world, you already know that OpenSSL 1.0.1 suffers from a serious vulnerability that allows a remote attacker to extract data from the memory of a target computer. The vulnerability was first made "public" (by varying definitions of the word "public") on April 7th. The events leading up to the disclosure are interesting. If you haven't reviewed them, the Sydney Morning Herald does a great job of outlining the events leading up to the disclosure. Check it out here:

http://www.smh.com.au/it-pro/security-it/heartbleed-disclosure-timeline-who-knew-what-and-when-20140415-zqurk.html

So while it is clear as mud who knew about the vulnerability and when, it is very clear what happened

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Winners of the SANS Spectacular Pen Test Video Contest

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, friends, Romans, and countryman,

I'm delighted to announce the winners to our SANS Spectacular Pen Test Video Contest. Back in January and February, we asked folks to channel their creativity to share some great tips, insights, techniques, and inspiration with other penetration testers. You can read the contest description here.

We got some FANTASTIC entries, and we'd like to thank all who participated. Entries included numerous great technical tips, interesting "acting", noble attempts at humor, and even one Rick Roll, naturally.

So, without further ado (thanks, Ted, for your gracious input), let's announce the winners (click on each picture to see the video). We'll announce the victors in our four categories first, and then select from among them for the GRAND prize winner.

First up, our

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SANS Checklist for Securing Mobile Devices in the Enterprise

[Editor's Note: Lee Neely has developed a very useful spreadsheet checklist to help organizations better plan and mitigate security risks associated with mobile devices, including phones and tablets. It's really handy stuff, and I strongly recommend you check it out! --Ed.]

By Lee Neely

To help organizations better understand, manage, and mitigate risks associated with mobile devices and their infrastructures, we've released an updated SANS SCORE Mobile Device Checklist.This checklist is designed to provide a repeatable approach to adding mobile devices to your environment in a secure fashion. The intent is to be device agnostic, to support long-lasting results, and to provide a basis for making consistent decisions around having these devices in your environment, as well as proper protection of the information on and around them. Too often, I've seen instances where mobile devices were

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Tor-nonymous - Using Tor for Pen Testing

[Editor's Note: In this article, Chris Crowley provides some really useful tips for using Tor to anonymize your penetration testing. He provides details on strategy and tactics, along with some helpful configuration settings and scripts. His discussion of Privoxy is especially useful. Thanks, Chris! --Ed.]

By Chris Crowley

Pen testing derives its value from being able to emulate the behavior of real world attackers. We pen testers need to train ourselves to behave like those with malicious intent, but simultaneously maintain appropriate decorum and sensitivity to the operations of the networks we're trying to improve. Malicious attackers have no such restrictions.

This post is to share a method I use for obscuring the source IP address of my computer. Pen testers have two basic reasons for obscuring their source IP address. First, is to connect to malicious (or suspected malicious) resources when we perform research. Second, is to obscure the

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